Events

Fall Workshops

Restorative Practices in PBIS Community of Practice(CoP) in collaboration with Northwest PBIS

 Dates, & Topics, Join our online learning community!

  • Sept. 23, 1pm: Introductions and the Basics: What RP is and Is Not 
  • Nov. 18, 1pm: How do we Align RP with Behavioral Principals in the Multi-Tiered Framework? 
  • Jan. 27, 1pm: RP in PBIS Looks like and Sounds like, Fidelity tools 
  • April 27, 1pm: Restorative Conferencing: It’s More Than a Conversation 

Goals of the series 

  • Learn from regional experts who are training and coaching RP in a multi-tiered framework
  • Network with other coaches, teachers, and administrators
  • Gather resources for training, fidelity and evaluation of impact
  • Hear from national and regional exemplar implementers
  • ALL CoP webinars will include ready to use strategies for having those challenging conversations with your staff, peers, and parents. 

Who Should Attend? 

CoP Participants will get the most out of this series if they have a basic understanding of MTSS/PBIS, behavioral theory, and have had at least an overview of RP. You do not have to have gone through a full Restorative Practices training series but knowing the basics will be helpful.

Continuing Education Credits We will provide Clock Hours for Washington Participants and Certificates of Attendance for Oregon Participants. Joining us from another state? Let us know and we’ll see if your state will honor our continuing education documentation.

Cost: The entire series is $120

  • The CoP is set up as a series, so each topic will build on the previous webinar.
  • All webinars will be recorded; registration fees include URL to recorded webinars for you to use over and over again!
  • Webinar log in information will be emailed with your registration confirmation. 

 REGISTER HERE

Initial Restorative Justice Practices

October 24th-25th   Location TBD

8:30 am – 3:30 pm

$350.00

Light Breakfast and Lunch Provided

Clock Hours Offered

Register Here

Restorative Justice and restorative practices applied in our schools reflects an approach to wrongdoing and harmful behavior that aims to both prevent wrongdoing at all levels and intervene in offending behavior. Restorative practices help to build community, celebrate accomplishments, transform conflict, rebuild relationships that have been harmed, and reintegrate students who have been suspended or expelled. A restorative model fits well within the multi-tiered framework of Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS) and is at the heart, a prevention based approach. Come learn more about how to use PBIS in your school and district.  

Presenter: Carol Frodge, Sara Frodge and Lori Lynass

Building Social Emotional Learning (SEL) through Academic Strategies

November 4th, 2019

 Location TBD

8:30 am – 3:30 pm

$175.00

Light Breakfast and Lunch Provided

Clock Hours Offered

Registration Opening Soon

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) enables children and adults to manage and understand their emotions, set positive goals, build and maintain positive relationships and make responsible decisions. Through direct and indirect instruction, SEL in the classroom has been proven to help students learn better, perform better on tests and work in a more positive and collaborative manner with their peers. SEL skills in the classroom enable students to learn how to learn. This training outlines five different teaching strategies to build SEL skills through direct practice and discussion. By the end of the training, participants will better understand SEL skills and competencies and how to practice these skills in the classroom without an SEL curriculum.

Presenters: Carol Frodge Lori Lynass

Advanced Restorative Justice

November 5th, 2019

 Location TBD

8:30 am – 3:30 pm

$175.00

Light Breakfast and Lunch Provided

Clock Hours Offered

Registration Opening Soon

Restorative Justice is focused on the belief that those individuals causing harm can work together with those affected by the harm to repair it and that this collaboration leads to true accountability. A restorative approach brings awareness that misconduct is part of the developmental process of every young person. Corrective responses to misconduct using punishment can actually increase the likelihood that the misbehavior will re-occur. Both the theory and practice of Restorative Justice emphasize: (1) identifying the harm, (2) involving all stakeholders, and (3) true accountability— repairing the harm and addressing its causes. This advanced course will provide tools to run circles to address serious behavior incidences and the re-entry process following a suspension or expulsion.

Presenters: Carol Frodge Lori Lynass